Williamsburg’s other D.B.A. closing this month

dba

First there was DBA. Now D.B.A. — the craft beer bar on North 7th — is closing. Needless to say, this is horrible news:

We’re very sad to say d.b.a. brooklyn will be closing at the end of the month. It’s a special place for so many special people. Please come out and have a drink before we go!

The Saints face the Steelers @1 Sunday 11/30 so the game party will be on as usual & following we will have a send off (drink the inventory and say goodbye) bash…The facebook page will remain active and we will use it to let everyone know next steps (new location if possible??) or next place to meet as a group for a drink (or a few!)

p.s. – We’re open Thanksgiving @5pm – George will be behind the bar serving up turkey (wild) & cranberry (juice). It’s delicious!

Have a good holiday!
d.b.a. brooklyn crew

We’ll miss D.B.A.’s fantastic beer selection and lack of attitude. Looking forward to the Zara or P.F. Chang’s that will take its place. Ugh. [via]

Spike Hill is closing

spikehill

Another day, another Williamsburg institution announces that it’s closing:

Bedford Avenue mainstay Spike Hill will close its doors next month, the space confirmed to Gothamist today, as the building housing the bar and venue is currently under contract. “It’s unlikely that this bar will be a bar for much longer,” revealed an employee at the bar this afternoon.

The employee, who asked to remain anonymous, was cagey about offering a final date for the closure, but conceded that “early December” was a workable timeline. He wasn’t sure about future plans for the space, whether it would be kept intact or torn down, but said he didn’t think “the building is worth anywhere near what the real estate is worth.” One thing was definitely clear: “The building’s under contract for a lot of money.”

At least we can ‘celebrate’ its demise next month.

Ridgewood is the new Bushwick which was formerly the new Williamsburg

06zJPRIDGEWOOD2-articleLarge

Dancing at Gottscheer Hall; credit: NY Times

Well you knew this was coming. The Times discovers Ridgewood. “Artsy types in their 20s and 30s, wearing hoodies and black-frame glasses” are invading Ridgewood. (The ban on saying “hipsters” seems to continue.) Evidently, Quooklyn is filling up with dudes who dance like the guy pictured above, “boozy revelers in cutoffs and ’90s basketball jerseys,” and there are “sexual acts [happening] out in the open:”

Cafes with vegan muffins, yoga studios and destination pizzerias have (naturally) sprouted. Bars with names like Milo’s Yard and Bierleichen are slated to open. Guitar cases, tote bags and shearling coats are increasingly frequent accessories on pedestrians. [Read more...]

285 Kent booker/manager on Vice Media and the closing of Williamsburg’s clubs

vice

Vice Media, credit: Brooklyn Rail

It’s no secret that Vice Media is expanding and soon will take over every part of South Williamsburg not owned by or J Crew or Two Trees. Still, the owners of the clubs that have been displaced by Vice (Death By Audio, Glasslands, 285 Kent) have been very tight-lipped about why they are shuttering. We reached out to Glasslands yesterday and haven’t heard a peep. What’s with all the secrecy?

Gawker tracked down Ric Leichtung, the guy who ran the now defunct 285 Kent and got an answer:

The landlord’s been waiting for a pay day like this for years. The landlord’s made little headway on bringing the building up to code to host legitimate businesses, opting for these really short term 2 or 3-year commercial leases to illegal loft spaces and quasi-legal establishments like 285 Kent so that the landlord could easily kick them out or wait for their leases to expire and cash in when they found a buyer. [Read more...]

This is the end of Williamsburg (part 2394827639484692374)

radegast

[Drinking Brooklyn]

If it wasn’t re-zoning, American Apparel, The Edge, Monster Island, Duane Reade, Whole Foods, 285 Kent, Dunkin Donuts, “Space Ninety-Eight,” Death By Audio or that Apple Store that is probably opening, then THIS is surely the end of Williamsburg:

A rumored real estate deal could cause trouble for some of Williamsburg’s most successful eateries, meaning not even the neighborhood’s bougie gentrifiers are safe from…the effects of gentrification. A possible $100 million deal to purchase several properties on North 3rd Street has been dished to the Real Deal, which reports that Waterbridge Capital could pay around $1,000 per square foot for the space at 103-119 North 3rd Street. Current tenants of said properties include beer hall Radegast, brunch dominator Egg, Mexican spot Viva Toro and hirsute chocolatiers Mast Brothers.

The deal gives Waterbridge about 110,000 total buildable square feet, including more than 50,000 square feet of residential space with 41 rental units that are ripe for repositioning, sources said. The properties generate about $4 million in annual income, a source said. [The] businesses are likely paying below-market rents, and will be repositioned over time.For its part, Radegast doesn’t see itself going anywhere, with the owner telling us he had four and a half more years on his 12-year lease plus an option for 10 more years after that. He hadn’t been approached by anyone about the sale of the building, but said he “knew what he had” and would negotiate with his current landlord, Olga Sosa of Berry Enterprises Uses, LLC. We reached out to Egg and Mast Bros. and we’ll update if we hear back.

These properties are just a stone’s throw from 76 North 4th Street, the site of Williamsburg’s rumored Shake Shack. At the time, a Radegast worker told us he heard that “Marshall’s and TJ Maxx’s [were] going in and subterranean parking lots,” and that given the “state of Williamsburg” he wouldn’t be surprised if the rumors were true. Whether these businesses will be ousted and replaced with gleaming new condos or some other monstrosity remains to be seen. At least whatever moves in will probably go well with Whole Foods.

[Gothamist]

Whatever.

Here’s the ‘Judgmental Map of Williamsburg’

Judgmental Map of WilliamsburgThe latest in Will Nunziata‘s Judgmental Maps series features a judgmental map of Williamsburg. The map has everything the bros of the North 12th area to the ‘Average Diner’ (Kellogg’s) on Union and Metropolitan. Fairly accurate?

- @joshmorrissey

Colony 1209: tone deaf condo in Bushwick looking for “settlers” to colonize “new frontier”

the-colony

Given all the displacement happening in New York’s most rapidly gentrifying neighborhood, you’d think developers and the PR companies would show a little more tact:

Here in bohemian Bushwick, Brooklyn, you’ll find a group of like-minded settlers, mixing the customs of their original homeland with those of one of NYC’s most historic neighborhoods to create art, community, and a new lifestyle.

Like-minded settlers? Mixing the customs of their original homeland? A colony? Gross.

The Awl is appropriately perturbed too:

According to the website of aptsandlofts.com, the brokerage firm renting units at Colony 1209, only fourteen units remain available in Colony 1209. The rest are occupied by renters settling what the luxury building’s website calls “Brooklyn’s new frontier.” That “new frontier” is “bohemian Bushwick, a vibrant industrial setting reimagined through artful eyes.” The area—where there are just as many empty lots overgrown with weeds and buildings with boarded-up windows as there are tree-lined streets, Puerto Rican flags, and yards with colorful lawn ornaments—might unnerve some potential settlers if Colony 1209′s website didn’t reassure them, “we already surveyed the territory for you.”… [Read more...]

Permanent Records closing due to the over-inflated rent crisis that’s pummeling New York

store-500x332

We just lost Lulu’s and Brooklyn Ale House is closing soon. Now this!

The main reason for the record store’s closing has nothing to do with being analog in a digital world, unfortunately it has to do with Real Estate. Like many businesses in Greenpoint, Permanent Records has fallen victim to an over-inflated, hyper-speculative, bullish market where astronomical rents and lost leases are becoming the norm. Cool folks like Permanent Records, who found love in Greenpoint, are now priced out of the neighborhood that once welcomed them with open arms.

“Permanent Records will close the Franklin St. location not because we’re not doing well, but simply because we’ve lost our lease. None of you reading this will be shocked to hear that after months of looking for an affordable suitable store front, we’re now priced out of the neighborhood we helped to shape. It’s an all too common story in the NYC retail / small business landscape.”